National Wear Red Day: American Heart Association shares heart health tips

February 4 is National Wear Red Day. As we kick off Heart Month, the American Heart Association shares important tips to better your health.

One in three women will die of cardiovascular disease, but we can lower those awful numbers with lifestyle changes.

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Reclaim your rhythm! That's the new theme of the American Heart Association this heart health month. They're trying to help women build healthy habits to give them the best chance at life.

"Reclaiming your rhythm is really coming out of being in a lockdown (during the pandemic) and being more active. We know that women do not get enough physical activity. We know that we should be getting a lot more than we typically do," says Mel Edwards with the American Heart Association.

She is teaming up with women who are sharing the message as well through their PSA, including Shameka who warns:  "All women need to know that cardiovascular disease is the #1 killer of women!"

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Women are speaking out, trying to protect other women, about heart disease!

Finding a good rhythm can help get you moving and increase your heart rate. Wear Red Day is all about living healthier and remembering not only yourself but your loved ones.

"When I look at my family, with my mother and my daughter, one in three, well that's right here with the three of us. So, I'm working hard to make sure that my mother is taking care of knowing what she needs to do. That's your blood pressure, that's your BMI, that's how much activity are you getting in a day, that's what you eat. Then my daughter, who's 25, is making sure that she's doing the same thing, and then I'm smack dab in the middle, but we're doing our part," explains Mel.

Heart disease can sometimes be reversed with lifestyle changes.

"Making sure that you are getting your fresh fruits and vegetables. You're looking at your proteins, you're looking at how are you powering your body so that it works better for you, and it will last longer with you. So that's part of that reclaiming your rhythm. Knowing how your body is functioning and going to your doctor," says Mel.

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What's good for your heart is good for your brain, so eating healthy and exercising can also reduce your risk of a stroke, the #5 killer.

"Eat your veggies, get your protein, move your body, get a song, reclaim your rhythm, reclaim your life, and don't be a one in three," states Mel.

The American Heart Association encourages you to take charge of your health, using resources at GoRedforWomen.org on physical activity, healthy eating, controlling blood pressure, and managing sleep and stress.