Local Houston leaders react to Harris’ win

"It was in Houston in 2015 and so the picture I posted today was actually the day when she took me aside," Amanda Edwards recalled the first time she met Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris. 

Edwards is a former Houston City Councilmember.

"I shared with her at an event that I was running for office and she took me aside and she literally coached me. She did not have to do that," Edwards added.

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It was the first of several times Edwards would meet with Harris. Edwards describes feeling elated seeing a mentor, fellow woman of color, and Alpha Kappa Alpha soror take the second-highest office in the land.

"Today was a marker for history for so many who came before Senator Kamala Harris and so many who will able to walk through the door after because of this historic moment," she said smiling.

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Fort Bend County Judge KP George is also celebrating the news.

"It is amazing. It is history!" he told FOX 26.

George shared a note his daughter wrote about what Harris' election means to her as a young Indian-American woman.

"My daughter sent it to me and said, 'As a young woman of color watching Kamala Harris win the Vice Presidency is a huge inspiration to me and many of my peers. I rarely see representation of people like me in power,'" George read.

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George notes Harris' South Asian descent but feels her election is representative of the strength from America's broader diversity.

"I honestly believe everybody should have representation," he added.

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He believes her diverse background can be used to unify a divided country. Edwards agrees.

"What she will bring to the table as well as President-Elect Biden is an ability to unify and celebrate the strengths of our multicultural presence and existence -- that everybody belongs in America," Edwards said.

Edwards says she expects to see members of the Divine Nine black fraternities and sororities celebrating for a long time.