Was That Fake? - bar bans use of the word 'literally'

Was That Fake?

Fights break out across French supermarkets over discounted Nutella. This one is absolutely true. The chocolate hazelnut spread was discounted 70 percent, bringing the price down from around $6 to just under $2. Shoppers shoved each other to get their hands on a jar, and in some stores, things actually got a bit violent.

Was That Fake?

The number of teens eating Tide Pods and other detergent packs is skyrocketing, despite widespread reports of poisoning cases. The American Association of Poison Control Centers reported 39 cases of Tide Pod exposure in 2016, and 53 in 2017. But there have been 86 cases in the first three weeks of 2018 alone, of teens eating the packs. Procter & Gamble, the company that makes the Tide Pods, said it is working with Facebook and YouTube to take down videos of teens eating the products.

Was That Fake?

A CDC doctor claims that the disastrous flu shot is causing the current flu outbreak. Not only is this headline false, it is actually dangerous, and it’s been one of the most shared articles on Facebook in recent weeks. The article in question quotes made-up medical professionals from the CDC, claiming that all the people who have died from the flu had all gotten the flu shot. This is not true. The current flu shot is not as effective as it has been in recent years, but it has not been linked to any deaths. Get your flu shot!

Was That Fake?

A New York bar bans customers from using the world "literally." This one is true. The Continental, located in the lower east side of Manhattan, has banned all use of the word in the establishment. The owner says “literally” is the most overused, annoying word in the English language. Customers caught using it must finish their drinks in five minutes and leave.

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